Computerised Tomography

What Is Computed Tomography?

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Computed Tomography (CT) is a special type of digital imaging scan that utilizes x-rays to create images of your body that can be shown in multiple planes.

Booking An Appointment For A CT Scan

GVIG performs CT examinations at 104 Nixon St Shepparton, Echuca Radiology, Benalla Health Radiology, Seymour Medical Imaging and Kyabram Medical Imaging. In order to have a CT you will require a referral from your doctor. All CT examinations need a booked appointment. Please call the receptionist staff to make your appointment and to ask any questions you may have regarding the procedure you are booking in for. It is important that you bring your Medicare card and any current health care / pension cards to your appointment. If you suspect that you may be pregnant, please advise our staff before your examination.

Preparation For My CT Scan

When you make your appointment, the receptionist will explain the preparation needed for your examination depending on what part of the body you are having scanned. You may be required to fast for a period of time before some examinations. Additionally, some scans require that you drink oral contrast and / or have intravenous contrast. Depending on the procedure you are having, you may be required to cease taking some medications. This is particularly important if you are having an injection and are also on blood thinning medication. Again depending on the body part you are having scanned, you may be asked to remove any jewellery, keys or metallic objects as these can affect the quality of the images taken.

Why Do We Use Contrast Intravenous Contrast?

Contrast is an important part of medical imaging and is used to make some lesions more conspicuous and to highlight normal anatomical structures.

Oral Contrast Intravenous contrast

If your examination requires an oral contrast you will be required to drink the contrast one hour before your examination.

Intravenous contrast

The administration of intravenous (IV) contrast requires a small injection in the arm. There is a small risk associated with administration of IV contrast. You may be asked to complete a health questionnaire if it is possible that you may require administration of an IV contrast, and the nurse or radiographer will ask a number of questions prior to administration to ensure this risk is minimized.